10 Best Capsule Hotels in Tokyo

capsule hotel unsplash Accommodation

Are you traveling to Tokyo and looking for accommodation? There are so many options to choose from ranging from upscale hotels to traditional ryokan to budget-friendly options. If you are looking for the latter, you can opt for something like a business hotel or a hostel. But have you ever considered a capsule hotel? You may have heard about this more recent minimalist-style hotel in which the ‘room’ where you sleep is about the size of a single bed, stacked upon and below another identical ‘room’. Facilities like showers and toilets are shared and are usually fairly simple. For the budget-conscious traveler it can be a great option and a fun experience, especially as some of the newer capsule hotels almost feel futuristic. If you are deciding last minute and are traveling alone there is often a free space in one of Tokyo’s many capsule hotels. As the amenities and location can be very important and differ from hotel to hotel, let us help you on your way with our list of 10 of the best capsule hotels in Tokyo!

1. Nine Hours Otemachi-Imperial Palace

Photo by: ninehours9h

With a clean and futuristic feel to it, Nine Hours Otemachi-Imperial Palace is perfect for those who want the typical Japanese capsule hotel experience. Every guest gets their own locker and the shower room has cabinets that you can lock up. Men and women also sleep on separate floors. The hotel’s location is very central and convenient, and is only a short walk to the Imperial Palace and Tokyo Station from where you can take the shinkansen, metro, and JR train to almost anywhere in Japan. There are also plenty of great dining options in the area.

Book Here: Nine Hours Otemachi-Imperial Palace

2. 1 Night 1980 Hostel Tokyo Asakusa Simple Stay

As the name implies, 1 Night 1980 Hostel Tokyo Asakusa Simple Stay offers an honest and straightforward accommodation for a great price. They provide some amenities for free such as slippers and a toothbrush, and you can use their coin laundry machines for a small fee. There is also a common area with a vending machine for drinks, and as a bonus, there’s an outdoor terrace that guests can use. This hotel is especially good for travelers who want to explore the popular tourist areas Asakusa, Ueno Park, and Akihabara, as they are all within walking distance. 

Book Here: 1 Night 1980 Hostel Tokyo Asakusa Simple Stay

3. commun SHIBUYA (Male Only)

Shibuya

If you are looking for a night in the town, Shibuya is one of the best places to do so. It is the neighborhood where young people come to drink, dance, and meet new people. So what would be better than to stay at a crawling distance from its main streets where most clubs and bars are? commun SHIBUYA is located right in the middle of all the action. There are lockers, a vending machine, and even a TV in every capsule. However, please note that commun SHIBUYA is a male only accommodation. 

Book Here: commun SHIBUYA

4. Capsule and Sauna Rosco

If you don’t mind the lack of WiFi and enjoy taking a hot bath and sauna, then Capsule and Sauna Rosco is the place for you. It is quite a local spot and has many Japanese guests. There are 3 indoor baths as well as an open-air bath, a sauna, a common area, and an onsite restaurant. In addition, the hotel even offers its own massage service. Men and women stay on separate floors. The closest train station is Komagome in the north of Tokyo, and the hotel has good access to tourist attractions in Asakusa, Ueno Park, nostalgic Yanesen, and the off-the-beaten-path Rikugien Garden.

Book Here: Capsule and Sauna Rosco

5. do-c Ebisu

ebisu garden place

do-c Ebisu’s claim to fame is their beautiful European wooden interior and their large Finnish-sytle sauna that guests can enjoy. Another big advantage of staying in this capsule hotel is that you’re in Ebisu, which is one of Tokyo’s more upscale areas that has many nice eateries and bars minus the noise of other popular nightlife districts. Ebisu is also only a 15-minute walk from Shibuya so you can enjoy clubs and bars nearby as well.

Book Here: do-c Ebisu

6. Booth Netcafe & Capsule

Omoide Yokocho Shinjuku

Only a 4-minute walk away from Shinjuku’s famous Omoide Yokocho you will find Booth Netcafe & Capsule, a dedicated manga cafe and capsule hotel all in one. So if you like reading (or browsing) Japanese comic books, this is the hotel for you. They also have PCs available and there is a smoking area on the 7th floor. 

Book Here: Booth Netcafe & Capsule

7. Shinjuku Kuyakusho-mae Capsule Hotel

Also situated in the nightlife hub that is Shinjuku, Shinjuku Kuyakusho-mae Capsule Hotel is a great place to stay, especially for men. Ladies can stay as well and there is a women-only floor, but the large bathhouse and sauna are only available to men. They provide full amenities so if you are planning on traveling pretty light, this capsule accommodation might be a good choice for you. There is a business and relaxation lounge for all guests, and all capsules come equipped with a TV.

Book Here: Shinjuku Kuyakusho-mae Capsule Hotel

8. Akihabara Bay Hotel (Female Only)

Akihabara

Because capsule hotels are often used by men who missed the last train home after a long night of drinking and just need a cheap place to sleep, most capsule hotels are geared more towards men. However, Akihabara Bay Hotel is a place especially for the ladies! Due to the fact that most sleeping areas in capsule hotels can’t be locked, many women may feel safer in a women-only facility like this. All the usual amenities such as a locker, laundry room, towels, an in-capsule TV, free wifi, a shared shower room, and a small lounge are there to make your stay comfortable. Akihabara is a good neighborhood if you are looking to explore the subculture-heavy area itself, Ueno Park, or Asakusa. 

Book Here: Akihabara Bay Hotel

9. Khaosan Tokyo Samurai

Asakusa Kaminarimon Gate

Khaosan is a chain of budget-friendly hostels for fun-loving tourists, and Khaosan Tokyo Samurai is their Asakusa-based capsule hotel. There is a Japanese-style common area with tatami mats where you will surely feel at home, and you can enjoy as much free tea and coffee as you’d like. It’s a non-smoking establishment and all the usual amenities such as a shower room with soap and shampoo, a coin laundry room, and lockers are all available for use. They also have a shared kitchen with cooking utensils for everybody to use.

Book Here: Khaosan Tokyo Samurai

10. Capsule Hotel 310 (Male only)

If you want to stay a bit outside of the central Tokyo area, Capsule Hotel 310 in Koiwa is situated in one of Tokyo’s eastern suburbs near Chiba prefecture. It takes about 20 minutes to get to Tokyo Station from here and the hotel is only a 3-minute walk from Koiwa station. This male-only capsule hotel features a small sauna and public bath, an on-site restaurant, and free wifi. There are also PCs that you can use for a fee, and there’s a shared lounge area where you can take it easy.

Book Here: Capsule Hotel 310

Traveling in Tokyo

Are you coming to Tokyo for the first time, or maybe have been before but would like to get to know the city on a deeper level? Tokyo is so chock full of fun things to do and experience that it can be hard to know where to start. Doing a private tour is a great way to truly experience the city, as your local guide will take you by the hand and show you all the best places that Tokyo has to offer. Because we offer private tours, the itinerary can always be adjusted to fit your interests and needs. We offer loads of fun tours such as a Tokyo Highlight tour, local Tokyo food and drink tour, and a Izakaya hopping tour to name a few. We hope that you are able to enjoy Tokyo to its fullest and that you have found a capsule hotel you want to stay at from our list of the best capsule hotels in Tokyo! 

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Happy traveling!

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Stefanie Akkerman moved from the Netherlands to Japan in 2013 with her Japanese husband and son. She jumped into the niche of Dutch tour guiding in Tokyo and Kamakura in 2015 and occasionally writes articles about all the great sights and activities Japan has to offer. She loves (Japanese) food, and to work that all off she goes diving, snorkeling, cycling, or hiking.

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